Adynovate Patient Story: Brett

Meet Brett

Brett at a Glance
Patient
Golfer
Coach

Brett—On being a golfer, coach, and managing his hemophilia A

When did you find out you had hemophilia A?

My parents had me tested right after I was born because my cousin had it. From that moment on, they treated me with kid gloves. They watched over me carefully for signs that I might be bleeding, but I didn’t need my first factor VIII infusion until later when our family got into a car accident. Although no one was injured, my parents took me to a children’s hospital to get checked out as a precautionary measure and to have an infusion. What a lasting impression that hospital has had on us. Even after all this time, I’m still treated at the same hemophilia treatment center. I’m very happy with my doctor and treatment team because they take the time to listen, they treat me like a partner in my health, and they’re on top of treatments and the latest research.

What was growing up with hemophilia A like for you?

I was a kid who always wanted to do the things that I couldn’t or shouldn’t do and...I confess, I was a little pistol. Very headstrong. Whenever I faced an obstacle, I was bound and determined to use my resources to figure out a possible solution.

At the age of eight, after my parents and I talked to my doctor and he gave me the okay, I took up golf. That being said, certain activities, including golf, aren’t for everyone with hemophilia A, which is why you should always talk to your doctor. My doctor told us that if anyone even suspected that I might be injured from playing golf, I should call him or go to a treatment center immediately for care. By the age of 18, I had won six Junior League Golf tournaments. I got to play all over the world, and I met some great people in the process. Over those important childhood years, I attended a hemophilia camp where I learned to self-infuse–which gave me a sense of independence.

“I like the simple dosing schedule of infusing on the same days every week, twice a week.”1
What has your hemophilia A treatment journey been like?

About three years ago, I was recruited to coach a softball team for my company. My doctor gave me his permission first of course, and he reminded me that I needed to be cautious. But I was noticing that I was having a lot of bleeds, so I discussed it with my doctor again, and he recommended that I switch from on-demand, to prophy treatment. Always consult with your doctor to determine which treatment regimen is right for you.

I had fewer bleeds, which showed that my doctor and I had made the right decision for me regarding my treatment plan. I also tracked my bleeds through an app on my smart phone. Yes, there’s an app for that.

How did you find out about ADYNOVATE®?

I strive for zero bleeds, so my doctor called me to talk about ADYNOVATE. After discussing the benefits and risks, including the common side effects of headache and nausea and other potential reactions, he thought it would be a good option for me because of the extended half-life and twice-weekly dosing schedule.1 So I was really interested and wanted to hear more because I trust in Takeda, based on previous knowledge and experiences. Since I have been on ADYNOVATE, I have not had a bleed.

I like the simple dosing schedule of infusing on the same days every week, twice a week.1 For me, my doctor prescribed that I take ADYNOVATE on Mondays and Thursdays and continue to see him on a regular basis. I like infusing in the morning, because that’s how I like to start my day. There are days, though, when trying to get to work on time with our rambunctious kids, God love ‘em, is a little uh…hectic…I try to set aside 10 minutes to mix and infuse.

“Since I have been on ADYNOVATE, I have not had a bleed.”
What is your support system like?

My parents raised me to be self-reliant and proactive about my health, which prepared me to always try to take good care of myself. Now, my wife, Landi, and I live in Florida with our two children, seven-year-old Landen and four-year-old Delani. So now I feel I owe it to them, too, to take care of myself.

One of the things I really like about Takeda is the assistance and support services I’ve received through their Hematology Support program. Also, because I was eligible, I have received co-pay assistance, which I really appreciate.

“I strive for zero bleeds, so my doctor called me to talk about ADYNOVATE. After discussing the benefits and risks, including the common side effects of headache and nausea and other potential reactions, he thought it would be a good option for me.”1
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ADYNOVATE [Antihemophilic Factor
(Recombinant), PEGylated] Important Information

What is ADYNOVATE?

  • ADYNOVATE is an injectable medicine that is used to help treat and control bleeding in children and adults with hemophilia A (congenital Factor VIII deficiency).

ADYNOVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

SELECTED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use ADYNOVATE?

Do not use ADYNOVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamster protein
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADYNOVATE or ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADYNOVATE may not be right for you.

ADYNOVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), PEGylated] Important Information

What is ADYNOVATE?

  • ADYNOVATE is an injectable medicine that is used to help treat and control bleeding in children and adults with hemophilia A (congenital Factor VIII deficiency).
  • Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you ADYNOVATE when you have surgery.
  • ADYNOVATE can reduce the number of bleeding episodes when used regularly (prophylaxis).

ADYNOVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

SELECTED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION

Who should not use ADYNOVATE?

Do not use ADYNOVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamster protein
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADYNOVATE or ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADYNOVATE may not be right for you.

ADYNOVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant), PEGylated] Important Information
What is ADYNOVATE?
  • ADYNOVATE is an injectable medicine that is used to help treat and control bleeding in children and adults with hemophilia A (congenital Factor VIII deficiency).
  • Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you ADYNOVATE when you have surgery.
  • ADYNOVATE can reduce the number of bleeding episodes when used regularly (prophylaxis).

ADYNOVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION
Who should not use ADYNOVATE:

Do not use ADYNOVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamster protein
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADYNOVATE or ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)]

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADYNOVATE may not be right for you.

What should I tell my HCP before using ADYNOVATE?

Tell your HCP if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice or hamsters.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if ADYNOVATE passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if ADYNOVATE may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because ADYNOVATE may not work for you).
What important information do I need to know about ADYNOVATE?
  • You can have an allergic reaction to ADYNOVATE. Call your healthcare provider right away and stop treatment if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.
  • Do not attempt to infuse yourself with ADYNOVATE unless you have been taught by your HCP or hemophilia center.
What else should I know about ADYNOVATE and Hemophilia A?
  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body’s normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop ADYNOVATE from working properly. Talk with your HCP to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.
What are possible side effects of ADYNOVATE?
  • The common side effects of ADYNOVATE are headache and nausea. These are not all the possible side effects with ADYNOVATE. Tell your HCP about any side effects that bother you or do not go away.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For additional safety information, click here for ADYNOVATE Full Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.



ADVATE [Antihemophilic Factor (Recombinant)] Important Information
What is ADVATE?
  • ADVATE is a medicine used to replace clotting factor (factor VIII or antihemophilic factor) that is missing in people with hemophilia A (also called "classic" hemophilia).
  • ADVATE is used to prevent and control bleeding in adults and children (0-16 years) with hemophilia A. Your healthcare provider (HCP) may give you ADVATE when you have surgery.
  • ADVATE can reduce the number of bleeding episodes in adults and children (0-16 years) when used regularly (prophylaxis).

ADVATE is not used to treat von Willebrand disease.

DETAILED IMPORTANT RISK INFORMATION
Who should not use ADVATE?

Do not use ADVATE if you:

  • Are allergic to mice or hamsters.
  • Are allergic to any ingredients in ADVATE.

Tell your HCP if you are pregnant or breastfeeding because ADVATE may not be right for you.

What should I tell my HCP before using ADVATE?

Tell your HCP if you:

  • Have or have had any medical problems.
  • Take any medicines, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements or herbal remedies.
  • Have any allergies, including allergies to mice or hamsters.
  • Are breastfeeding. It is not known if ADVATE passes into your milk and if it can harm your baby.
  • Are or become pregnant. It is not known if ADVATE may harm your unborn baby.
  • Have been told that you have inhibitors to factor VIII (because ADVATE may not work for you).
What important information do I need to know about ADVATE?
  • You can have an allergic reaction to ADVATE. Call your HCP right away and stop treatment if you get a rash or hives, itching, tightness of the throat, chest pain or tightness, difficulty breathing, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea or fainting.
  • Do not attempt to infuse yourself with ADVATE unless you have been taught by your HCP or hemophilia center.
What else should I know about ADVATE and Hemophilia A?
  • Your body may form inhibitors to factor VIII. An inhibitor is part of the body’s normal defense system. If you form inhibitors, it may stop ADVATE from working properly. Talk with your HCP to make sure you are carefully monitored with blood tests for the development of inhibitors to factor VIII.
What are possible side effects of ADVATE?
  • Side effects that have been reported with ADVATE include: cough, headache, joint swelling/aching, sore throat, fever, itching, unusual taste, dizziness, hematoma, abdominal pain, hot flashes, swelling of legs, diarrhea, chills, runny nose/congestion, nausea/vomiting, sweating, and rash. Tell your HCP about any side effects that bother you or do not go away or if your bleeding does not stop after taking ADVATE.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

For additional safety information, click here for ADVATE Prescribing Information and discuss with your HCP.